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What do Faith Communities Offer to the Climate Crisis? Hope

The annual IFCMW Interfaith Leadership Summit attracts some of the most engaged people of faith I have ever met. (Image credit: IFCMW.)

The annual IFCMW Interfaith Leadership Summit attracts some of the most engaged people of faith I have ever met. (Image credit: IFCMW.)

During times of great turmoil, uncertainty, and fear, emotions and rhetoric rise. Denial also sets in as people struggle to make sense of the world around them. Writing on her blog, Climate Stew crew member, Keisha McKenzue raises questions about crises and responses, particularly in regards to climate change. The entire piece is well worth reading and reflecting upon. This part in particular jumped out at me.

So much of the discourse around climate change frames it as “crisis,” or “corruption,” or “conspiracy,” but people of faith are well-positioned to offer an alternate framework.

Faith and spirituality can generate an orientation of hope based on humanity’s capacity to not only create problems but also solve them, to not only break down order but also build new orders from periods of chaos.

People of faith can ground their hope in Christian teachings about human will and the divine inspiration that draws us toward the good; or Jewish teachings about our responsibility to safeguard human welfare and protect what future generations need to thrive; or Muslim teachings about the deen, the comprehensive religious duty that includes managing resources without waste or excess.

Keisha covers language, denial, and more. Read more: From Actions to Metaphors: Language Matters

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Author: Peterson Toscano

Peterson Toscano is a quirky queer Quaker concerned about Climate Change. His website is www.petersontoscano.com

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