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Category: Queer

Hot Climate Action — LGBTQ Style

A Queer Response to Climate Change?!?

A researcher contacted me recently to follow up on a blog post I wrote about how LGBTQ+ people are affected by climate change. The researcher is hoping to publish something but ran into some roadblocks from the editors of a journal.

I have found that conference organizers and academic journals think the concept of connecting LGBTQ and climate change so bizarre that they almost immediately reject any proposal. This was true with organizers of the World Pride event in Toronto a few years ago.  When we proposed a presentation on a “Queer Response to Climate Change,” they could not see how that had anything to do with LGBTQ human rights. They dismissed our request which led to send them a written manifesto. While it never convinced the Pride organizers, it did serve to inspire LGBTQ+ here in the US and beyond.

The researcher asked me some very helpful questions that you too might might to consider. If you want to be in touch with the researcher, contact me directly.

Here are the questions and my answers:

1. In the context of your sexual identity, how do you see yourself being personally affected by climate change (consider, for example, in preparing for climate change and in experiencing climate change)?

I do not see myself as an environmentalist in large part because the American environmental movement is so hetero-centric as is much of the US camping culture. I like nature, but not the domesticated nature of national parks and camp sites.
Rather I feel like a Walt Whitman naturalist who wants to dive into the wilderness, off the beaten path and embrace nature as I become intimately connected to it.
Naked and Very Afraid
This past summer I attempted a Walt Whitman “Leaves of Grass” moment. I dove into the woods and began to strip down to my boxers. I wanted to lie on the ground and feel the earth under me. Suddenly I remembered all of the warnings about the exploding tick populations. I failed to bring repellent. I worried about mosquitos carrying diseases. In that remote place I was suddenly reminded of the negative affects of a warming planet, the consequences of the immoral fossil fuel lifestyle of the modern world. I felt exposed and insecure and afraid. I recoiled, got dressed, and fled to a domesticated space.
LGBTQ Seniors and Climate Change
While I am not yet a senior citizen, that is coming up quickly. I hated air conditioning ever since I lived in Memphis and endured it freezing my nipples off until I went out into the blazing muggy daylight to defrost. Also AC is expensive and energy intensive. More severe and frequent heatwaves are predicted. Elderly people are affected by heatwaves which can lead to severe illness and death.
As a gay man, I do not experience the same equality as heterosexual citizens and residents. My job and career got disrupted because I am gay and had to leave it and start over. I don’t have a big pension coming my way. I do not have children or the prospect of children, while many if not most heterosexuals do. Often children help look after aging parents. There are real risks from climate change as I get older. I don’t have children checking in on me to make sure I am ok during heatwaves and other extreme events. I live in a rural part of the USA and worry about healthcare and discrimination.

2. What about other LGBT+ people? What issues might/do they face? (perhaps you can draw from the experiences of friends/colleagues)

I think of homeless LGBT+ youth, up to 40% of the homeless youth population in most cities. They often avoid shelters. Many shelters are private ventures run by churches. There is often no knowing how church folk will receive LGBT+ kids.
Also, most shelters are gendered spaces: boys to one side, girls to the other. What about transgender youth? Gender non-binary and genderqueer youth? LGBTQ+ youth often do not like going to these shelters.
On a warming planet we see more frequent and extreme weather events like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina. Where do these kids go when shelter becomes a matter of life or death? Are we developing shelters that are specifically and intentionally friendly towards LGBTQ+ youth?
Similarly I think of LGBTQ+ senior citizens. They too are affected by extreme weather and heatwaves and do not have the same social and family support enjoyed by cisgender and heterosexual citizens.

3. How should LGBT+ people get involved in responding to climate change? (I’m thinking at all levels here, from international to local)

a. Break the collective silence around climate change and do it in a creative way. Much like during the early HIV/AIDS Crisis when the government could give a damn about gay men and people of color (gay and straight) suffering with GRID (gay related immune deficiency as it was first called) when virtually no one was talking about or covering the epidemic, today with climate change I am reminded: Silence=Death. We need storytellers, artists, people concerned with human rights, creative queer communicators to tell the story of climate change and to engage the public.
b. Work on local and regional resiliency and community building. Develop a list of all the LGBTQ+ seniors in the community. Check in with them before and after storms and heatwaves. Open up community centers and LGBTQ+ friendly spaces as cooling centers during the hottest days of the year. Help with retrofitting homes with what will be cheaper energy efficient technology. Help LGBTQ+ people who are marginalized because of poverty, race, gender identity/expression with adaptation including growing food and water collection.
c. Recognize that climate change results in migration and immigration and that within that population there are LGBTQ+ people who are also affected by homophobia/transphobia. They may be deeply marginalized in their own families and among fellow migrants. Provide services, language classes, community, and opportunities to connect w/ LGBTQ+ migrants.
d. Recognize that during extreme weather events political leaders override existing policing rules when they declare a State of Emergency. There are curfews, forced evacuations. As a result, there are opportunities for human rights abuses and injustice. This directly affects LGBTQ+ people who are poor and/or homeless. Educating first responders, political leaders, and police about LGBTQ+ populations and reporting any and all abuses of power are essential.
e. Educate ourselves about climate change as a human rights issue and apply for funding for adaption in our communities to specifically reach out to LGBTQ+ folks to educate them and convince them that they have skin in the game.

4. How would you try to convince someone that the impact of climate change on LGBT+ communities in particular is an issue that needs to be addressed? (for example, by analogy, like the Pink Triangles)

Original art by Kevin Miller

Storytelling. The power of stories is one that we learned during the HIV/AIDS Crisis. This included visuals like the AIDS quilt and the red HIV/AIDS ribbon (which inspired countless other ribbons.) During the Transgender Day of Remembrance, we hear stories that move us to tears and to action.

I use my creativity to help people see that climate change affects pets, coffee, wine, a picnic in the park, policing and incarceration, and much more. I do not think anyone needs to become an environmentalist to be concerned about climate change. Rather they need to understand that something they are already passionate about is threatened by climate change.

I also think comedy has a role to play: not mocking people dismissive of climate change: that is not really that funny and just ends up with people feeling smudge because they recognize climate change is real. Rather comedy is a queer response to climate change. It immediately instils the conversation with hope and it relaxes people so that they can hear what they often filter out.
Most heterosexuals talk about climate change in a way to stir up fear, shame, and anger. We can use comedy and storytelling instead to inspire curiosity and engagement.

5. What needs to happen/change to protect LGBT+ people from climate change?

a. First and most importantly, we need to radically reduce pollution that leads to climate change: coal, oil, gas, natural gas along with farming practices that also contribute to the problem. But this needs to be done on a national and international scale, not by individual consumers scaling back.
We need system change and policy change about how we get our energy—a great transition from dirty to clean energy. One of the most effective ways to do this is through carbon pricing. Put a fee on all fossil fuels that contribute to global warming. To do this requires both thoughtful and respectful lobbying and non-violent direct action. (As the host of Citizens’ Climate Radio and a volunteer lobbyist for Citizens’ Climate Lobby, I am working with lots of people on this very thing.)
b. Educate LGBTQ+ people, particularly leaders that climate change threatens us in specific ways and that our voices are needed to both change policy and to creatively communicate to the public at large about the program. We must move beyond polar bears and future generations to communicate other  compelling reasons to act to address climate change.
c. We need to be part of coalitions who are addressing climate change in part to help influence strategy so that they are justice minded and aware that LGBTQ+ are concerned and want to be part of the solutions.
d. We must talk about climate change as LGBTQ+ people. In other words, “queer” the climate discussion. And with that queering insert mirth, play, beauty, and art. What we lack in addressing climate change is a lack of imagination. While we do not have exclusive rights to creativity, we have demonstrated in fighting the oppressions we have faced that we can use creativity, camp, and art to take on powers.

Here is my campy contribution:

OUT for Sustainability’s Fab Planet Summit 2016

San Francisco: June 3rd to 5th the amazing intersectional queer climate gathering known as Fab Planet Summit

OUT4S-sustainabilityOUT for Sustainability has hosted an annual gathering of LGBTQ sustainability leaders since 2009. The first Social Sustainability Conference hosted 60 participants in Seattle, Washington for five panels on intersectional topics ranging from “race and housing” to “age and community.” The spirit of this was continued by the Coming Out Local dinners, hosting 100 guests per year to highlight the value of local economy in creating communities that celebrate diversity. In addition to this large annual events, OUT4S hosted dozens of community Salons on topics ranging from the “social impact of food systems” to “green building in the gayborhood.”

Identifying the value and uniqueness of the content at OUT4S events, Fab Planet Summit launched to build on these the spirit of these gatherings to achieve deeper connection for broader change.

I will be far away in a little village in South Africa during the summit, but I long to go to one the first chance I can. They are looking for more speakers and presenters. Check out their site, and if you can go to the summit, take lots of photos and tell me about it!

Powerful eye-witness account connects HIV/AIDS Crisis with Climate Action

In February at the Creating Change Conference in Denver, I got to c0-facilitate a workshop, A Queer Response to Climate Change, with Keisha McKenzie, J Mase III, and Rev. Nancy Wilson, moderator of the Metropolitan Community Church. Nancy has served the LGBTQ community since the 1970’s and was on the front lines of HIV/AIDS activists when our ancestors had to Act Up for justice. Silence_equals_death

As part of our workshop, I interviewed Nancy about the early HIV/AIDS struggle and asked about lessons we learned that we can apply to our current climate crisis. She speaks eloquently about times in history when we take the risks for justice and life. She connects the movements so beautifully–queer liberation, #BlackLivesMatter, and climate change. She also reminds us that we have strength when faced with a crisis. Here is her interview as it appears in Episode 24 of the Climate Stew Show.

How to Queer Ecology and the Environmental Movement

My eco-gender-queer-faith friend, Mario in Malta, sent me a link to this lovely interview with Alex Johnson, a gay man looking at the intersections of LGBTQ and ecology. Here is the first question:

alex-johnson-500

Alex Johnson

Q. You propose the queering of ecology. What does that mean to you?

A. Queering ecology means hosing out the pigeonholes. The queer movement bravely claims that humans are inherently capable of a much wider range of behaviors than the powers-that-be give us credit for. Queer ecology is the extension of that claim to all life on Earth. All living things, we are now learning, are capable of a wide variety of behaviors.

The most basic task of queer ecology is to throw light on “the biases and limitation of the human observer,” as Bruce Bagemihl says in the introduction to his groundbreaking Biological Exuberance. Happily, I am not the first or only “queer ecologist.” Catriona Mortimer-Sandilands has provided much of the scholarship for the burgeoning field. She co-edited the recently published Queer Ecologies, the first collection of academic essays on the subject. I expect and hope more will follow.

Read the whole article at Grist.

We’re Here, We’re Queer, and we have lessons about Climate Activism

For almost two years now I have been siting with the query, What is a Queer Response to Climate Change? I have asked it privately in my study. I mull over it in the pool as I do laps? I consider it as I read Audre Lorde, Walt Whitman, and Bayard Rustin? I ask it on stage through a variety of characters. I discuss it with LGBTQ activists, clergy, and random people on trains. It’s been a rich query to consider that stirs up many answers.

Queers for the Climate at Peoples Climate March Sept 2014

Queers for the Climate at Peoples Climate March Sept 2014

This week’s episode of Climate Stew looks at some of the answers to this query. You will learn about Marisol Jimenez, a high schooIMG_0705l teacher from Texas, a lesbian very concerned about her community who over the next 50 years will do wonders. (Yeah, in our studios we have access to archives of audio from the future!) Also, hear a very moving, heartwarming, and insightful word from Marvin Bloom who considers the many ways that LGBTQ people have faced extinctions and exterminations. He reflects on the lessons we learned–how we got it wrong as well as right–and how these lessons can be applied to the Climate Movement.

Enjoy Episode 16: A Queer Response to Climate Change.  Climate Stew is available on  iTunes,  StitcherSoundCloud, or Listen here  on our site. Oh, and we love your comments!!

If you want to share Marvin’s monologue with LGBTQ folks and allies, we have posted it directly over at SoundCloud.

Episode Three of Climate Stew: Sounds and Voices from Peoples Climate March

Armed with my audio recorder, I marched in NYC last week with the Queers for the Climate. In this short podcast you will hear a dozen people explain why they are marching for climate. Included among the group of passionate and humorous folks is Justin Vivian Bond, the well known performer who also wrote the memoir, Tango: My Childhood, Backwards and in High Heels. Also, listen for the profound moment of silence followed by the raucous moment of noise followed by a marching band and protest chants.

 Rev. Nancy Wilson opens and closes the segment with words of wisdom and hope. See the complete show notes here and also enjoy Climate Stew podcast on iTunes and Stitcher Radio.

Climate_Stew_Logo_Square1400x1400

Peoples Climate Pride Parade!

While I could have marched with the Quakers or the Citizens Climate Lobby, in the end I opted to march with the Queers for the Climate. Good choice! I also recorded lots of audios and mini interviews for the Climate Stew Podcast. Stay tuned!

preparing the puppets and queers to march (see glen retief?)

preparing the puppets and queers to march (see glen retief?)

Ready to March on W 83rd Street

Ready to March on W 83rd Street

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Fierce, just fierce

Fierce, just fierce

Her sign got a lot of attention.

Her sign got a lot of attention.

Justin Vivian Bond on the far right (she marched the whole way with us)

Justin Vivian Bond on the far right (she marched the whole way with us)

Video posted by Earl Dax reveals we know how to chant and look fabulous on 42nd Street

A homage to Robin Williams by a sociology professor who marched beside me.

A homage to Robin Williams by a sociology professor who marched beside me.

IMG_1756

Love the buggy eyelashes

Love the buggy eyelashes

These two got up early to prepare (or never went to bed the night before)

These two got up early to prepare (or never went to bed the night before)

Wind & Fire ready to march

Wind & Fire ready to march

We're here; we're queer, and OMG those pumps will kill you!

We’re here; we’re queer, and OMG those pumps will kill you!

This one even has the global warming pout going on.

This one even has the global warming pout going on.

IMG_1763

Even Frida showed up

I was there. See peeking in the bottom of the frame.

I was there. See peeking in the bottom of the frame.

Marching in Midtown

Marching in Midtown

IMG_7554

And a drag queen shall lead them on.

And a drag queen shall lead them on.

I’m Wet for Climate

There is movement afoot among LGBTQ folks concerned about global warming. Queers for Climate, a group out of New York City, is trying to creatively communicate the threat of sea rise and flooding in the NY Metropolitan area. New York City will get wetter as lots of other places dry out. Turns out this is what alarms me or than all those poor polar bears stranded on ice flows. It’s easy to ignore those distant white bears, but in this short video in voicing what alarms me, I reveal just how shallow I am .

We’re Here. We’re Queer, and we are concerned about the climate.

I have gotten involved with a new group, Queers for the Climate, which is organizing to take part in the big People’s Climate March on September 20 and 21 in New York City. While lots of LGBTQ people have shown real concern for environmental issues, recycling, and buying eco-friendly products, when it comes to Global Warming, I find that many of my queer peers seem to live on another planet, one that does not see the possible extinction of humans along with a bunch of other species. That is changing, and it is a good thing because we come to the table with lots of experience and skills to help us address Climate Change as the world’s biggest threat to human rights.

We can be funny, irreverent, edgy, and creative in our climate activism. We can also look beyond ourselves to consider the wider world and the intersection of LGBTQ lives affected by the climate change crisis that is upon us.

Here are some memes I created on the theme of Queer Climate Action. Enjoy and share. Yo, Global Warming activism, it’s not just for heterosexuals anymore.

 

gay marriage end of world

drag queen anger

save heterosexuals

penguin meme

chad and lance save world

goats meme